Black seed oil: Benefits, Uses and Side Effects

Black seed oil

What Is Black Seed Oil?

Black seed oil

Nigella sativa, a native of southwest Asia, is the source of black seed oil, which is pressed from the seeds of the plant.

Speaking of black seed oil, we must know what the black seed is and what its composition and benefits are, and then use it in many treatments and its harms. So, the black seed is an annual flowering plant found in southwest Asia in its bitter taste. Black cumin oil is extracted from this plant and is known by other names such as Qazah, Shunyaz, Shunyaz, Black Kalonji, Black Caraway

Black seed Botanical description

The black bean is an annual herb with a height of 30 cm. It has a branched stem, deep leaves, blue to gray flowers, and seeds in the form of serrated pods. Its original home is the Arabian Peninsula, the Arab Mashreq, the Maghreb, Iran, India, and Pakistan. It is cultivated in the Mediterranean region.

Black seed

How to extract oil from black seed

With regard to the black bean and how to extract the oil from it, it is a very detailed and multi-stage process. Cold pressing is done at low pressure to preserve the properties of this wonderful bean. Then the oil extracted from the bean is stored in a dark place at a temperature of 4 degrees Celsius, and then this oil is filled In biodegradable capsules or in edible plastic containers under any conditions

The antioxidant thymoquinone is found in black seed oil. Free radicals, which are dangerous substances in the body, are detoxified by antioxidants. Toxic exposure can cause the body to create unstable chemicals that can damage DNA and cause cancer.

Black seed oil has been around for more than two millennia. According to some reports, it was found in King Tut’s tomb. Nigella sativa seeds, which have a mild bitterness, are used in Middle Eastern and Indian cooking. It is also available as a dietary supplement.

Black seed oil has scientific support for some purposes, but not all of them. Uses, side effects, and preparation of black seed oil are covered in this article.

Black seed oil benefits

1.   Diabetes:

Type 2 diabetes symptoms such as elevated blood sugar and insulin resistance can be alleviated by traditional medicine practitioners using black seed.

For diabetes, there is a lack of evidence to support the advantages. Sudden blood sugar decreases can be harmful for diabetics.

Consult with your doctor before using black cumin supplements if you have diabetes.

Patients with type 2 diabetes may benefit from supplementing their diet with black seed, according to several big studies involving hundreds of people.

It lowered both blood glucose and cholesterol levels, which may have long-term advantages (by also reducing HBA1C).

Fasting blood glucose levels were improved by 5 milliliters of black seed oil in a prospective study of 60 patients with insulin resistance.

However, it was only used in conjunction with other blood sugar and cholesterol-lowering drugs in this instance (metformin and atorvastatin).

Adding black seed supplementation to the diets of diabetics on oral anti-diabetes medications reduced the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Consuming 2 grams of black cumin seeds everyday for a year lowered cholesterol, blood pressure, and body mass index (BMI).

Extract from black cumin seeds assisted to activate insulin sensitization pathways and energy balancing pathways in rats, both of which are critical in type 2 diabetes. in rats (AMPK).

However, the existing evidence is inconclusive and restricted. In order to ascertain whether black seed is advantageous for all diabetics, additional clinical research are needed

2.   Asthma

In one research of 29 asthmatic patients (15 mL/kg with 0.1 g percent cooked extract daily), a boiled extract of the seeds alleviated asthmatic symptoms.

Over the course of three months, it reduced the frequency of asthma symptoms, wheezing, and improved lung function.

Additionally, patients who consumed black cumin seed extract needed less medicines and inhalers.

Similar findings were found in a placebo-controlled study of 80 asthmatics.

The study found that taking black seed oil by mouth for four weeks improved asthma management. Scientists also saw an increase in lung function.

3.   Male Infertility

In a short study of 68 infertile males, daily consumption of 5 ml (1 tsp) of black seed oil for two months enhanced semen quality without causing any side effects. This study’s findings have not been duplicated by other researchers, therefore we can’t make any strong conclusions from it.

Black seed raised testosterone levels in diabetic rats. Another rat study found that it increased sperm quality and motility, most likely due to its antioxidant activity. More investigation is required.

4.   High Blood Pressure

Blood pressure was reduced in patients with mildly increased blood pressure after two months of daily administration of black seed extract. 100 mg or 200 mg of extract were given to the test group every two hours for a total of six days. It also decreased “bad” LDL cholesterol, which may block blood arteries, in addition to lowering blood pressure.

After two months, the oil reduced blood pressure in a different research involving 70 healthy individuals. There were no documented side effects. Black seed oil was given to the patients twice a day in 2.5 ml doses.

Other studies have shown that powdered black seed capsules don’t have an effect on blood pressure, cholesterol, or body mass index.

Similarly, black cumin seed extract had no effect on systolic blood pressure in older adults with moderate hypertension (systolic BP 160 mmHg). 300 mg of the extract was administered twice daily for one month to the 76 trial participants.

Black cumin seed powder appears to have a greater effect in lowering mildly raised blood pressure than black cumin seed oil. Although it may assist in moderate cases of hypertension, the authors caution that any lowering of blood pressure may take as long as two months to take effect.

As a whole, there is insufficient data to support the blood-pressure-lowering effects of black seed.

There has been more heart-related research done in animals. Black cumin seeds, for example, have been shown to aid in the regeneration of rats’ damaged heart tissue (in response to heart surgery or post-heart attack treatment).

Exercising and eating black seed may help prevent heart disease in rats, according to a separate study. Humans have not yet been subjected to these consequences.

5.   Inflammation

Blood pressure was reduced in patients with mildly increased blood pressure after two months of daily administration of black seed extract. 100 mg or 200 mg of extract were given to the test group every two hours for a total of six days. It also decreased “bad” LDL cholesterol, which may block blood arteries, in addition to lowering blood pressure.

After two months, the oil reduced blood pressure in a different research involving 70 healthy individuals. There were no documented side effects. Black seed oil was given to the patients twice a day in 2.5 ml doses.

Other studies have shown that powdered black seed capsules don’t have an effect on blood pressure, cholesterol, or body mass index.

Similarly, black cumin seed extract had no effect on systolic blood pressure in older adults with moderate hypertension (systolic BP 160 mmHg). 300 mg of the extract was administered twice daily for one month to the 76 trial participants.

Black cumin seed powder appears to have a greater effect in lowering mildly raised blood pressure than black cumin seed oil. Although it may assist in moderate cases of hypertension, the authors caution that any lowering of blood pressure may take as long as two months to take effect.

As a whole, there is insufficient data to support the blood-pressure-lowering effects of black seed.

There has been more heart-related research done in animals. Black cumin seeds, for example, have been shown to aid in the regeneration of rats’ damaged heart tissue (in response to heart surgery or post-heart attack treatment).

Exercising and eating black seed may help prevent heart disease in rats, according to a separate study. Humans have not yet been subjected to these consequences.

Black seed oil for hair

1.    The hair is nourished and moisturized by this product.

If you want silky, nourished hair, try this. Bridgette Hillside, a licensed trichologist and creative colorist, says black seed oil is said to nourish and smooth hair.

You should try it for yourself to see whether it works for your hair; however, she warns that the benefits are mostly based on anecdotes and not on scientific data, so you should proceed with caution.

2.    Aids in the treatment of skin problems on the scalp

Black seed oil may be helpful if you have issues with your scalp or skin. Black seed oil’s antibacterial and antifungal characteristics make it useful for treating skin disorders including eczema and psoriasis on the scalp and throughout the body.

The results of several animal research suggest that black seed oil may help treat and manage scalp disorders as well as or better than prescription medicine; however, more rigorous human trials are needed to confirm these findings.

Pay attention if you’re battling dandruff. Black seed oil’s anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory, and anti-fungal qualities have been found to help reduce the growth of several fungal species in basic scientific research studies.

Dandruff is thought to be caused in part by common fungal species found on the scalp. Using black seed oil in conjunction with other active substances can help reduce dandruff. Unscientific proof backs up this insurance claim, despite the fact that there isn’t much clinical evidence to support it.

3.    Can keep dandruff away

Pay attention if you’re battling dandruff. Black seed oil’s anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory, and anti-fungal qualities have been found to help reduce the growth of several fungal species in basic scientific research studies.

Dandruff is thought to be caused in part by common fungal species found on the scalp. Using black seed oil in conjunction with other active substances can help reduce dandruff. Unscientific proof backs up this insurance claim, despite the fact that there isn’t much clinical evidence to support it.

There are numerous benefits to using black seed oil for hair, including the possibility that it can help your hair grow. The antihistamine thymoquinone found in high concentrations in black seed oil has long been used in the treatment of alopecia, leading some to believe that black seed oil could promote hair growth.

Black seed oil is rich in omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, which improve blood flow to the brain. This is meant to promote quick hair growth within a few weeks, according to popular belief.

4.    There is a possibility that it will encourage hair growth.

There are numerous benefits to using black seed oil for hair, including the possibility that it can help your hair grow. The antihistamine thymoquinone found in high concentrations in black seed oil has long been used in the treatment of alopecia, leading some to believe that black seed oil could promote hair growth.

Black seed oil is rich in omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, which improve blood flow to the brain. This is meant to promote quick hair growth within a few weeks, according to popular belief.

Black seed oil side effects

It’s possible to experience adverse effects when ingesting black seed oil, as with any other supplement, says Snyder. When using this supplement, be sure to consult with your doctor about any possible adverse effects, including those related to your eating habits, lifestyle, and any medications you may be taking. It is also recommended that women who are pregnant or breastfeeding consult their physician to determine whether or not black seed oil is safe for them to use.

In some cases, when applied to the skin, black seed oil has the potential to create an allergic reaction, hence a small patch of skin should be tested before using the oil on a larger area of skin. Snyder emphasizes the significance of avoiding oil contact with the eyes, nose, and other delicate areas of the body.

Is black seed oil safe to use in cooking?

“Black seed oil should not be heated and can be taken raw. For the first time, it is recommended that you only consume one teaspoon of black seed oil at a time “Snyder believes this to be the case.

You should dilute it with lemon juice or honey to mask the harsh flavor of black seed oil, she says. It’s a good idea to remember that this oil has a strong flavor, and use caution when drizzling it on salad, mixing it into smoothies, or adding it to tea.

Can black seed oil be harmful?

Possible Negative Reactions

Black seed oil’s long-term safety and the safety of higher doses than those found in food are both unknowns. Black seed oil, however, has been linked to a number of adverse effects, including:

  • Increased concentrations of black seed oil’s melanthin component may be hazardous.
  • The liver and kidneys may be harmed if an excessive amount of black seed oil is consumed.
  • Black seed oil may produce an allergic reaction known as allergic contact dermatitis in some people who apply it to their skin directly. A woman who applied Nigella sativa oil to her skin experienced fluid-filled skin blisters. In addition, she may have had a systemic reaction because she swallowed the oil (such as toxic epidermal necrolysis).
  • Blood coagulation may be slowed by black seed oil, which could lead to bleeding. Therefore, if you have a bleeding issue or are taking medicine that interferes with blood coagulation, you should avoid using black seed oil. ” Stop using black seed oil at least two weeks before your operation date so that your body has ample time to heal.
  • In addition, there is a chance that black seed oil will interact with a wide range of common medications, including beta-blockers.

Conclusion:

Many studies have revealed that the properties of black seed oil may have a role to play in treating or alleviating a variety of health issues.

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